biochar: industry update

As addressed by Kathleen Draper, IBI Board Chair in the 12/2020 newsletter, industry interest in biochar has been limited to agriculture, but recent interest in biochar has come from industries such as environmental engineering and waste management, along with an increasing number of companies, cities and countries that are embracing biochar as part of theirContinue reading “biochar: industry update”

master the garden: soil basics

Soil. A natural body embracing the topsoil, but also the subsoil and other layers above its parent rock – is a complex material that supports all life on earth and is a product of the environment – of the rock waste which is its parent material, of the climate under which it weathers, of the kind of topography upon which it is situated, of the vegetation and other organisms with which it develops, and of the length of time during which it has been developing. 1966 in An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock

making the cut: fruit trees

For the gardener who grows fruit trees, the purpose is to grow quality fruit in a reasonable quantity, and harvest safely from from healthy trees. Pruning is a management tool that helps align these goals and balances the needs of both tree and gardener.

atomic gardening

I have lived my entire life in the nuclear age. Technically, we no longer label present day as the “nuclear age”, meaning we do not define the present by nuclear technologies, that have been replaced by other disruptive technologies, which strikes me as odd since the world is filled with thousands of nuclear weapons, obtainContinue reading “atomic gardening”

making the cut

science based pruning: part 1 – healthy start In the forest no one prunes the plants and trees – so why all the fuss about pruning? I think my library has six ‘How To’ books on pruning, several illustrated guides and one volume, so weighty, that it is used for a door stop in myContinue reading “making the cut”

latin for the accidental gardener

Not often do gardeners have the opportunity to bring something back to life. Latin is now considered a dead language, meaning it’s still used in specific contexts, but does not have any native speakers. Before diving farther into the ‘A’s’ of botanical Latin – I would like to pause and take a look at some common Latin prefixes andContinue reading “latin for the accidental gardener”